Focused

Freshman%2C+Nikko+Rodriguez%2C+stares+at+his+paper+with+a+look+of+frustration+on+his+face.+He+suffers+from+ADHD+and+has+trouble+focusing+in+school+because+of+his+condition.+
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Focused

Freshman, Nikko Rodriguez, stares at his paper with a look of frustration on his face. He suffers from ADHD and has trouble focusing in school because of his condition.

Freshman, Nikko Rodriguez, stares at his paper with a look of frustration on his face. He suffers from ADHD and has trouble focusing in school because of his condition.

Javier Martinez

Freshman, Nikko Rodriguez, stares at his paper with a look of frustration on his face. He suffers from ADHD and has trouble focusing in school because of his condition.

Javier Martinez

Javier Martinez

Freshman, Nikko Rodriguez, stares at his paper with a look of frustration on his face. He suffers from ADHD and has trouble focusing in school because of his condition.

Daniela Araujo, Writer

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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder better known as ADHD and attention deficit disorder or ADD, affects the life of many students. Freshman Nikko Rodriguez suffers from ADHD and is just one of the 129 million children who deal everyday with ADHD.

“It’s something that most people make fun of you for having, but they don’t realize the toll it takes on your mind,” he says.

Everyday ADHD and ADD cause problems for many children, problems they constantly deal with. Those diagnosed with ADHD or ADD find themselves fighting their condition to appear normal, just like everyone else. ADHD/ ADD is a condition that causes children to lose concentration and focus for a certain period of time.

“6.4 million American children ages 4-17 have been diagnosed with ADHD,” ADD Resource Center stated.

Though not scientifically proven as to what causes ADHD or ADD in children, many theories and accusations have been made, whether it is substance abuse while pregnant or biologically passed down by parents.

“If a parent has ADHD or ADD, a child has more than 50% chance of having it,” WebMD states.

When it comes to this disorder, tasks that other kids find easy, may become difficult tasks for people with ADHD or ADD.  When students make statements like, “It’s not that hard”, “Did you take your medication”, or “Chill out,” it may serve as a reminder to those diagnosed how their condition is not understood by everyone or increase their frustration. The lack of others understanding what ADHD is sometimes leaves students like Nikko feeling a negative way.

“I feel like I have to separate myself from others in order to concentrate without interruption,” Nikko mentions.

Some students who have been diagnosed would change the fact that they have ADHD even though it is a big part of who they are. They seem to think that is only a burden on their life and that they are not accepted by those who do not understand.

“It bothers me a lot, people don’t really have to remind me that I have ADHD.” “I’m aware and if I could change I would,” sophomore, Terrell Jackson, mentioned.

Students with ADHD or ADD find an array of ways to treat their disorder, for some that means taking prescribed medication while for others it may mean finding their own outlet. Medications such as Concerta or Vyvanse can be used to help students increase their productivity and stay focused. However, not every student has access to medications, or in other cases students may deter from taking anything prescribed fearing the side effects the medications can cause.

“I don’t like to take medication like that, I want to feel like I can do it on my own and that I am capable,” Jackson stated.

Students like Nikko Rodriguez in turn have found their own ways to treat their disorder without taking medication.

“Football is my medicine to everything, it keeps me going because you have to do good in school to play,” he happily stated.

Teachers have found ways to teach their diagnosed students differently to better their learning experience. Allowing kids to get rid of energy has shown to be quite effective for teachers because it gives students with ADHD or ADD the opportunity to stay focused and engaged.

“For my students that have ADHD or ADD I’ll let them work while standing up and I’ll let them walk around, regain focus and let them get back to work,” Mrs. Rachel Walsh stated.

ADHD plays a role in many peoples life’s whether it is a good or bad one. It causes them to be easily distracted or causes impulsive behavior, leading to obstacles that the diagnosed have to overcome.  Many like Terrell would change it but they can’t, so instead they learn to cope with this condition and rise above it.