You Know Why I’m Here

Travis Scott’s partnership with McDonald’s leads TikTok pranks

%22McDonald%27s%22%0APhoto+from+Creative+Commons

JeepersMedia

“McDonald’s” Photo from Creative Commons

Gianna Stathakis, Editor

Travis Scott’s partnership with McDonald’s has recently brought upon chaos for workers and an opportunity for a TikTok prank for customers.

Travis Scott is widely known for being a hip-hop artist, with his most known song being “Sicko Mode”. After his collaboration with McDonalds was announced via Twitter on September 3rd, fans were instantly eager to try the meal.

The $6 Travis Scott meal consists of three items: a Quarter Pounder with bacon and lettuce, medium fries with barbeque sauce, and a Sprite. The meal may seem like an ordinary McDonald’s order, but that hasn’t stopped the insane amount of hype surrounding it.

“I find the hype of the Travis Scott meal amusing in a way, mostly because it just goes to show if you are famous and have your name on a burger then people will buy it,” McDonald’s employee, junior Daniela Araujo says.

The amount of profit that the collaboration is raking in clearly benefits McDonalds as a company, but it certainly isn’t making workers’ days any easier. Customers often order the Travis Scott Meal by pulling up to the drive-thru and saying “you know why I’m here”, and then proceeding to play “Sicko Mode”. This trend originated from the popular social networking app TikTok, and quickly spread all over the internet. Some workers found the trend funny at first, but after having people order by blasting music in their headsets multiple times a day, it is becoming a bit old to them.

“I have had people come through and order in funny ways. Sometimes I can’t help but laugh but then there are some times where it gets old,” Araujo says. “For instance, there was one guy who decided to sing Sicko Mode throughout his whole order.”

McDonalds even sent out a memo to employees, informing them of the alternative ways that customers may order the meal at the drive-thru. Other ways of ordering include customers saying that Cactus Jack sent them, or “it’s lit, sickomode.” Under #travisscott on TikTok, a number of young adults and teenagers have recieved over a million views by ordering in these ways.

“I think that TikTok had a major influence on the Travis Scott meal, I honestly think that if it wasn’t a trend on TikTok it would not have been that popular,” Araujo says. “Like when kids sent their parents to buy it for them some of them would ask for the TikTok burger instead of the Travis Scott meal.”

It’s safe to say that TikTok is responsible for a large number of people ordering the meal, but ultimately, the success of the collaboration stems from Travis Scott’s popularity as a musician and influence over teens.

“From his impossible-to-get Nike sneaker line, to a cereal collab with General Mills that sold out in 30 seconds, to a record-setting virtual concert series inside Fortnite, Travis Scott is the definition of big in culture,” McDonalds chief marketing officer, Morgan Flatley says, in a memo obtained by Business Insider. “He will resonate and spark excitement with our youthful multicultural customers, and has a few surprises to delight our crew and ensure they are part of the excitement.”

The popularity of the meal has even caused shortages of ingredients at McDonalds, who typically sells about 2 billion burgers per year without any ingredient shortages. The company is now controlling supply of Quarter Pounder beef, bacon, slivered onions and shredded lettuce.

The meal is limited time, and expected to be available through October while supplies last.